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-6
tuchodi -6 points ago +1 / -7

vaccines don’t prevent omicron infection

But they reduce its severity, and that keeps people out of hospitals, freeing up beds for people with other problems. It's early days but already they can see that: "Thus, during the proxy omicron period, we saw a maintenance of effectiveness of the BNT162b2 [Pfizer–BioNTech] vaccine (albeit at a reduced level) against hospital admission for Covid-19 that was presumed to have been caused by the omicron variant as compared with the rate associated with the delta variant earlier in the year." https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2119270

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DoggyDawg 1 point ago +1 / -0

You're now finally replying to what I actually was talking about.

Vaccines don't prevent infection. This is still correct, based on Ontario's data since omicron became dominant.

The study that you linked to shows 70% efficacy against hospitalization for omicron vs 93% efficacy for Delta. My prediction was that it wouldn't help. It does help, although it's waning. The results from this study still have to replicated.

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tuchodi -6 points ago +1 / -7

Current vaccines have no effect on omicron infection

vaccines don’t prevent omicron infection

Transmission rates and severity are two different things but you lump them together under "infection".

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DoggyDawg 1 point ago +1 / -0

I was not talking about transmission whatsoever. You were lumping them together.

I was talking solely about infection. The infection rate per 100,000 is higher for vaccinated people in Ontario right now and that has been the case since omicron has been dominant (It's higher likely because vaccinated have access to more places like sporting events, but it's likely the same).

https://covid-19.ontario.ca/data/case-numbers-and-spread

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tuchodi -5 points ago +1 / -6

Current vaccines have no effect on omicron infection

They reduce the severity of the infection.